Surfers Help Deliver Supplies To Victims Of California Wildfires

Last month, California faced some of the worst wildfires in recorded history. The fires wiped out homes, businesses, and forests, and it didn’t care who the properties belonged to. One of those pieces of property was a vineyard in Malibu belonging to billionaire Howard Leight. However, even though the business that he’d spent more than 10 years building was gone, Leight had no intention of staying down and out for long.

The roads into Malibu were completely cut off because of the fire, so Howard Leight decided to put his 143-foot yacht to use. He would use the boat to carry much-needed supplies to the residents of Malibu who had not fled prior to the fires.

Leight started by working with a buddy of his to get volunteers to help him out and request donations for supplies. A few days later, Howard’s yacht was loaded with supplies and powering toward Paradise Cove in Malibu. Once he arrived, he met a bunch of surfers who were hanging in the water, waiting for waves.

Leight’s yacht was too large to get close enough to the shore to offload the supplies. So, the surfers decided to pitch in and help the billionaire out. They loaded snacks, bottled water, and pet food on their boards and paddled the provisions into the shore. Some even hauled beer. It’s estimated that the surfers helped deliver more than 3,000 bottles of water and 100 gallons of gas to the Malibu residents who were in so much need of it.

The surfers said that while Leight brought the biggest cache of supplies, he wasn’t the only boat that showed up in the cove that day carrying supplies. They’d been hauling stuff into shore all day. It just goes to show that while surfers are all about catching epic sets, they’re the first ones to jump in and help out their fellow Californians in need.

The residents in Malibu and other areas ravaged by the California wildfires are still in pretty dire need. You can help out by visiting https://www.calfund.org/wildfire-relief-fund/. No surfboard required.